Tag Archives: Poetry

‘Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer’ in the Library of Congress!

So, I decided today to finally do a search of the Library of Congress’ online records to see if my book,Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer, made it into their system — even though it’s been out for over a year, the Library is slow to enter each new item into its database, so I wasn’t sure if it had made it’s way in yet. I was thrilled to find that yes, my book has been added to the system!

Though it is true that the Library of Congress does not physically hold all of the books submitted to them, it has been estimated that they do in fact add about 10,000 items to their collection each day. Others are traded with partner libraries. Regardless, each item is entered into their database as a legal repository of copyrights, and each publisher is required to send the Library two copies of the book upon printing.

I may never know if a copy of my book is actually sitting on a shelf in the Library of Congress, but knowing that a piece of my work may have made it into the national library of the United States is a really great feeling. However small the chance is, my book of poems could be sharing shelf-space with the great contributors of our society. I could be sharing the shelf with Shakespeare, Jefferson, Chaucer, Lincoln. Or I could just be a number in their catalogue, there for future reference and discovery. (The number dedicated to my book, by the way, is 2012939469, just in case you were wondering.)

Alright, that’s my little philosophical rambling for the day. All of you writers (musicians, artists, etc.) out there, keep this in mind: you could be shelved next to your very own heroes and never even know!

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Photos from the Creative Sustenance Reading at the UConn Co-Op

Fabulous, as always, reading from my book Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer.

Because I’m just oh so conceited, I present to you some photos from the reading I gave at the UConn Co-Op on November 12th in support of the Covenant Soup Kitchen. All photos are courtesy of the Co-Op’s facebook page.

Fellow reader of the night, Kate Schapira

Kate Schapira read from a number of her collections of poetry, including The Soft Place, How We Saved the City, and a chapbook whose title eludes me. Really a remarkable poet!

Just me addressing a sea of hair

It really was nice to see such a packed audience come out for a night of poetry and community. It’s not too late to help out! Head on over to the Covenant Soup Kitchen’s website to see how you can do your part.

One of the beautiful faces that will greet you at the soup kitchen

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‘Almost Rain’ — new poetry from Simon Perchik, available now!

Almost Rain by Simon Perchik

Almost Rain by Simon Perchik

Two months ago I was approached by Diane Smith, the founding editor of Grey Sparrow/River Otter Press (who published my book), about editing a book of poetry that she was considering publishing. I agreed, and within the hour I had an eighty page poetry manuscript with a familiar name on it — Simon Perchik.

Simon Perchik is an American poet who has been writing poetry since the 1960s. And when I say he’s been writing, I mean writing: with over 20 books credited to his name, he is one of the most widely published and prolific poets of our day. Repositories of his work and correspondence reside in the Library of Congress Rare Book Collection, The Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Collection at Yale, and the Avant Writing Collection at Ohio State University. In short, he’s a pretty big deal.

And I got to edit his work. Talk about pressure.

Themes of loss, loneliness, and longing are prominent in Perchik’s work, which thrusts the reader into a world of turmoil somehow still filled with beauty. What the poet accomplishes best is the conveyance of mood — to read one of these poems is to become one with the speaker; to feel the his pain, his joy. To put it bluntly, Perchik is the kind of poet that I one day hope to be. His poetry is the kind of poetry that someone can read, and reread, and reread and come away with a different interpretation each time; a new layer.

This poem, from the end of the book, is emblematic of the rest of the work within the monograph:

                              58

These waves still surface, not sure

it’s her lips that open and close, kept moist

though you can’t hear her voice

scented with rotting wood, weeds

and bottom sand—you row this boat

left, right, swinging your arms

half moonlight, half almost makes out

the words rising from empty shells

and the dress you first saw her in

—you need more arms, clear summer nights

from that inch by inch love song

heavier than these overgrown paths

no longer listening for her forehead

that once anchored the Earth

and water too knows what it has

reeling from a gentle stroke, another

another, facing the sky

it leaves behind, caressing her hair

her breasts, her shimmering—some nights

you can hear her, one by one

—some nights it’s colder, colder.

If you’re a reader of poetry looking for a book that capitalizes on over 40 years of training and practice — a careful honing of skills — then this is the book for you. It is a collection by a poet at the pinnacle of his career; a lifetime of expertise distilled into one beautiful tome. And to top it all off, it’s accompanied by the haunting art of Peter Ciccariello, who’s artwork has been featured in such notable publications as Poetry Magazine and the cover of Rae Armantrout’s 2010 Pulitzer Prize winning book, Versed.

Some say that life begets life. I say that poetry begets poetry. Pick up a copy of Almost Rain today and bring some poetry into your life!

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‘Jack loves Jill’ reprinted in Eunoia Review

Crook Hill, Peak District by Rick Harrison/Flickr

‘Crook Hill, Peak District’ by Rick Harrison/Flickr

And last but not least, poem #3 from my book Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer reprinted in Eunoia Review:

Jack loves Jill

but Jill doesn’t love Jack,
Jill loves Andy, who has a mustache
and works the next cubicle over,
next to the fax machine; and Andy,
when he gets up to fax his expense reports
out to the central office, smiles at Jill,
but checks out Steph,
the mail delivery girl with blonde hair and nice tits;
and Steph of course thinks that Andy is too old,
and what’s with that mustache?
This isn’t the 80s, and even if it was,
mustaches were never cool.
Maybe if he shaved it off
she’d give him a shot, a handjob
in the supply closet—but right now she’s into Bill,
who pushes the sandwich cart and drives
a red Camaro and is capital H-O-T: hot.
But Bill loves Phil, and Phil loves Kate,
and Kate loves Dave, and Dave loves
Jane, and Jane loves Pat, and Pat—
Pat hopes one day only to love himself.
His mother didn’t hold him enough as a baby,
or so the story goes.

Oh Jack and Jill walk up the hill
on their way to the company picnic,
and Jack leans in for a kiss, but Jill will have none of this
and gives him a slap, and they both lose their footing
and fall.

The human element in all of this, if you’re looking,
is in the falling.

 

This is a reprint of work originally published in Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer.

Tim Stobierski is an alumnus of the University of Connecticut’s creative writing program. A freelance writer and editor, he has interned for three summers with Yale University Press and is currently seeking a career in publishing. His first book of poetry, Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer, was published in October 2012 by River Otter Press.

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‘Permaculture’ reprinted in Eunoia Review

'Home Depot 4' by BernardBoyGenius/Flickr

‘Home Depot 4’ by BernardBoyGenius/Flickr

Poem #2 in Eunoia Review: ‘Permaculture‘ — check it out! Inspired by a TV ad for The Home Depot I saw years ago…you never know when inspiration will hit haha.

Permaculture

“Let’s plant a weekend, water it, and watch a summer grow.”
–The Home Depot

But why stop there?
Let’s plant a summer and harvest
a year, till in the year
and get back a decade. It’s all
in the soil, that’s what they say;
some say the soil
is even more important
than the seeds.
So let’s take a minute—scratch that,
a second, a picosecond—a chronon
and bury it in the backyard, down
where the children play. There’s plenty
of rain here, there’s plenty
of sun. In no time at all
we’ll have an eternity,
and if we till that back in like we did with the year
we can watch the next big bang
from the comfort of our own front porch,
and the one after that while we’re lying
in bed, and the next we’ll close our eyes to—
we’ll have seen it all before.

 

This is a reprint of work originally published in Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer.

Tim Stobierski is an alumnus of the University of Connecticut’s creative writing program. A freelance writer and editor, he has interned for three summers with Yale University Press and is currently seeking a career in publishing. His first book of poetry, Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer, was published in October 2012 by River Otter Press.

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‘Unleavened Love’ reprinted in Eunoia Review

'Baby Bread' by bebot/Flickr

‘Baby Bread’ by bebot/Flickr

In the coming days, three poems from my book Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer are to be reprinted in Eunoia Review. The first of the poems, ‘Unleavened Love’ went live tonight — check it out below, and be sure to check the original posting at Eunoia’s page (and pick up a copy of my book to get a copy of the original original)!

Unleavened Love

My sister couldn’t have a baby
so I made her one of bread

(I’m a baker by trade
and it was the obvious thing to do)

I mixed the dough
and let it rise
formed him into shape
fired him in the oven
and she loved that sweet-bread-baby with all her heart

She loved him like her own

But her husband
that Saturn-faced brute
in a drunken binge
raided the pantry and
finding nothing suitable to eat
turned to the crib
swallowed the baby whole

I offered to bake her another
maybe a daughter this time
but she just looked at me and cried

I don’t want another baby
I want
my baby
my child
sweet child
sweet boy

This is a reprint of work originally published in Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer.

Tim Stobierski is an alumnus of the University of Connecticut’s creative writing program. A freelance writer and editor, he has interned for three summers with Yale University Press and is currently seeking a career in publishing. His first book of poetry, Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer, was published in October 2012 by River Otter Press.

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Eunoia Review to reprint three poems from my book in mid-July!

Three poems from my book, Chronicles of a Bee Whisperer, will be reprinted by Eunoia Review on July 10th and 11th. As I mentioned in a previous post, Eunoia Review is an amazing online literary journal that aims to print two new pieces of writing each day, which really gives readers a lot to choose from.

The three poems that Eunoia is reprinting are “Jack Loves Jill”, “Permaculture”, and “Unleavened Love” — I’ll be sure to post a link when they’re up so you can take a look, get hooked, and then buy hundreds of copies of my book.

And if you haven’t taken the time to submit to them yet, do it! They publish a little bit of everything and are even willing to consider reprints — a great way to get the word out about your latest project!

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